Weird, Funny expressions

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Marine, Apr 17, 2015.

  1. Marine

    Marine Active Member VIP member

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    Some expressions/proverbs are present in many langagues. But others are very specific, and sometimes these expressions seem funny, weird or poetic.

    I think it will be cool to share our discoveries.

    So to start, a russian expression which make me laught the first time I heard it. The Russians use it to say that something is very clean and shinny.

    "блестит как у кота яйца"

    Shinny like the cat's balls
  2. Big_Dog

    Big_Dog Administrator Staff Member

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    lol - the eggs = testicles thing is present in many languages. I didn't know cat's balls are shiny.
  3. Bob

    Bob Active Member VIP member

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    For Cebuano if something bad happens to you can someone else thinks its not that big a deal, they might say:

    "layo sa tinae"

    "(it's) far from the intestine"
    I seem to recall a Russian equivalent for "I'll take the edge off my hunger" which was something like "I'm going to feed the little worm."
  4. Marine

    Marine Active Member VIP member

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    @Big_Dog : we don't use "egg" in french for testicules (or it is not commun). One of the more "fancy" expression is "les bijoux de famille", "the family jewels".

    Do english speakers use it often ?
  5. Bob

    Bob Active Member VIP member

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    I've never heard the worm thing in English. I saw the Russian phrase in a book called "So Say the Russians"
  6. pensulo

    pensulo Member VIP member

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    I can't think of any expressions that are weird, but there are a lot of weird (from my perspective) ways of phrasing things. One thing that does sort of make me smile is how the word "lepo" which means "nicely" or "beautifully" (when used as an adverb) and it is used in so many phrases where it wouldn't make sense so much if translated literally - e.g. hvala lepo = thank you nicely (hmm, maybe like "thank you kindly"?) but means "thanks a lot"; "molim lepo" literally means "I beg nicely" but means "you're welcome" (molim is a bit hard to translate as well since it has a bit of a versatile meaning).

    Anyways, what's funny about it is when my mum speaks English you see how her English is Serbianized through the use of "nicely":

    pensulo, take this outside
    how is it going to fit through the door?
    nicely!

    pensulo, put this on the table; hey, put it nicely!
  7. g27region

    g27region New Member

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    This expression coming from the fact that cats licking themselves for cleaning

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